Worth it just for the Zodiac Ride!!

The ONE to go on … For 20+ years!

Tiverton, Long Island

www

.oceanexplorations.

ca

Nova Scotia’s 

ORIGINAL

1.877.654.2341

Ocean Explorations

ocean rafting whale adventure!

Eco-tourism Adventures

of seals most often seen are Grey 
and Harbour. The Grey Seal is the 
larger and has a noticeably square 
head. Harbour Porpoise are the 
most abundant. At times, white-
sided dolphins run with the boat, 
swimming playfully along side, 
jumping in and out of the water.

This area of the Bay of Fundy is 

located on the Atlantic Flyway, a 
major migration route for many 
species of sea birds, shorebirds and 
waterfowl. Birdwatching is a special 
added plus with Puffins, Gannets, 
Cormorants, Shearwaters, Petrels 
and Ducks, both common Elders 
and American Blacks. 

Sport Fishing

The Annapolis Basin and lower 

Annapolis River are noted for striped 
bass, white bass, sea trout and white 
flounder. Public access is located just 
off Hwy 1 near the Tidal Power Plant. 
Record size bass have been landed.

French Basin Trail  

This scenic 1.2 km easy walking 

trail,

 

co-sponsored by Ducks Unlimited, 

is located in the heart of Annapolis 
Royal just 1 block from the

 traffic light. 

Encircling the picturesque Annapolis

 

River, it provides public education, 
improvement of the water quality, 
conservation of wildlife, plus year-
round eco-tourism fun for all ages.

Whale Watching

Whale watching adventures 

await you about an hour drive from 
Annapolis Royal from June to Sept. 
The Bay of Fundy’s great tides 
create a rich ecosystem that 
supports abundant wildlife, whales 
and seabirds. The waters off the 
mouth of the Bay of Fundy, from 
Brier Island up to Digby Neck, are 
important feeding areas. Enjoy 
minke, humpback and fin whales, 
harbour porpoise and Atlantic 
white-sided dolphins. Right whales 
are often seen. Sperm, sei, orca and

  

blue whales have also been spotted. 

Humpback whales, “

 clowns of 

the sea”, are the most likely to be 
seen. They breech (jump out of the 
water), flipper slap and tail lob the 
most  (bring the tail out of the water 
and slap it on the water). They also 
spy hop, coming out of the water 
nose first, to look at people. 

Finbacks are some of the largest 

at 60-80 feet, second only to the 
Blue. Minkes are the smallest of the 
group of whales in the Bay at about 
30 feet in length. They are quite 
friendly and often come close to the 
boats to delight visitors. You might 
even see the rare North Atlantic Right 
whale. Only about 350 are still living. 

Along with whales, you may 

also encounter seals, dolphins and 
harbour porpoises. The two kinds

Bread and Roses Inn

82 Victoria Street

Annapolis Royal    Nova Scotia

(902) 532-5727 / 1-888-899-0551

www.breadandroses.ns.ca

A magnificent Queen Anne Revival Mansion. 
9 luxurious rooms with private ensuite baths.

Furnished with fine antiques. Located in the heart

of the historic district. A smoke free Inn.

Whether you board a traditional boat or a zodiac, you’re sure to enjoy your whale watching adventure off nearby Digby Neck.

Oaklawn Farm Zoo

NOVA SCOTIA’S LARGEST ZOO

AYLESFORD - Only 45 min. from Annapolis

Open 10am to dusk - 7 days a week

Easter through mid-November

oaklawnfarmzoo.ca  902-847-9790

Andrew Eisnor

Photography

Mariner 

Cruises

Mariner 

Cruises

Whale and 

Seabird Tours

Whale and 

Seabird Tours

novascotiawhalewatching.ca

whales@novascotiawhalewatching.ca

Toll Free:

 1-800-239-2189

Toll Free:

 1-800-239-2189

Local:

 902-839-2346

Local:

 902-839-2346

welcome you to Brier Island

Penny Graham & Family

Whale Watch and Accommodation

Packages are also available

 Family Park

Beachside

FIND US:

25 km south of Annapolis Royal 

on Hwy 8 at Sandy Bottom Lake

AnnapolisCounty.ca

CALL US:

Mid-June - Labour Day

(902) 532-7320

Off season (902) 665-4637

Email: rec@annapoliscounty.ca

Lakeside Camping

Rustic Cabins

Supervised Swimming

Canoes  Kayaks

                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

EXPLORER,    

2016 Official Visitors Guide,    Page 11